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Lemongrass

£1.25

Lemongrass is an interesting and useful addition to the herb garden especially if you like Thai or Vietnamese cuisine. The long, slender, pale green stems of the lemongrass have a unique fragrant lemony tang. Once germinated this quick growing herb can be used fresh, dried or frozen.

This very attractive plant looks great in a pot or in a mixed bed as an ornamental grass. This tender perennial must be grown in warm weather or inside a greenhouse and must not be exposed to frosts.

      

When to Sow January to March indoors or under glass. 
Where to Sow Sow on the surface of moist compost and cover with a very fine sprinkling of compost or vermiculite.
Place the seed tray in a propagator at a temperature of 20-25C (70-75F) or seal it inside a polythene bag. 
Keep the compost moist but not wet. 
Do not exclude light as this aids germination which can take from 21-40 days.
What to do Next When seedlings are large enough to handle, transplant and grow them on in cooler conditions until large enough to plant outdoors. 
Harden off over 7 to 10 days outdoors when lemon grass plants are well grown and all risk of frost has passed.
Plant lemon grass outdoors in a warm, sunny and sheltered spot at 30cm (12in) apart in moist, well drained soil. 
  Alternatively grow lemon grass plants permanently in 25-30cm (10-12in) containers in a warm greenhouse or conservatory.
Harvest All year round once established.
Handy Tips Keep lemon grass plants well watered throughout summer and provide an occasional liquid feed.
Harvest individual stems of lemongrass when required by snapping them off at the base of the plant. 
To over winter, lift the plants in early autumn, pot up and grow through the winter in a greenhouse with a minimum winter temperature of 7C (45F). Keep the compost just moist throughout winter.
Companion Planting Grow with tomatoes and peppers
Nutritional Information A good source of the minerals Folate, Iron, Manganese and Potassium.
Serving Suggestion Lemongrass is best known for its use in Asian cuisine, especially Thai and Vietnamese. It can be used in salad, sauces and stir fries.


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