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Salad Leaves Land Cress

£1.25

Land Cress is a great substitute to watercress and is a lot easier to grow, as it does not require as much moisture and is very tolerant of cold weather. It has a strong peppery flavour virtually identical to watercress which is delicious in salads.

It can be grown successionally and harvested for most of the year, with protection in colder months, and as a cut and come again plant is great to grow in a pot or container on a patio to harvest right from your back door.

 

 

 

When to sow Sow successionally from March to September. 
Where to Sow Land cress prefers a semi shaded site with moist, nutrient rich soil.
Sow seeds thinly in growing position either in a seed bed or a pot/container, 1cm(1/2in) deep in rows 23cm (9in) apart for single plants or 15cm (6in) apart for cut and come again leaves.
Early spring and early autumn sowings will benefit from frost protection with a cloche/fleece or by placing pot/container in a greenhouse.
What to do Next When seedlings are large enough to handle thin out to 15cm apart. 
Water well, especially during periods of dry weather, and keep weed free.
Harvest leaves when they are about 10-15cm (4 to 6in) long. The more you cut the more it will grow.
Harvest June to November.
Handy Tips Plants may run to seed in very warm and dry conditions, to avoid this keep well watered and sow successionally.
Remove any flower stems as soon as they appear to prolong the cropping period.
Land Cress makes an excellent green manure. Once the plant has finished producing usable leaves simply dig them back into the ground.
Companion Planting Good companion: Brassicas, onions, chives, peppermint, spearmint
Nutritional Information Good source of Vitamins A and C, minerals Iron and Calcium
Serving Suggestion The young leaves can be eaten raw, cooked or as a seasoning. They are delicious in salads and as a watercress substitute.


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