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Sweet Marjoram

£1.25

Sweet Marjoram is a staple herb in English and French cuisine, often found in a bouquet garni, it goes well with beef, lamb, poultry and fish. It has a mild delicate flavour with the leaves best used fresh as their flavour is sweeter and milder.

It grows well in a herb garden or a container where it can be brought inside for use during winter. During summer, the plant is covered in white flowers which are loved by pollinating insects.

        

When to sow All year round indoors, outdoors May to September.
Where to sow Grows best in light well drained soil, in a sunny position. 
Sow seeds indoors 0.5cm (¼ in) deep, in pots or trays of compost and lightly cover the seeds with a sprinkling of compost , and place at a temperature of 15-20°C.
Sow direct outside, once all risk of frost has passed, in shallow seed drills or in pots or containers.
What to do Next When seedlings are large enough to handle, transplant into 7.5cm (3") pots and harden off the plants for 7 to 10 days. 
If to be grown outdoors transplant them into their final growing position once the risk of frost has passed, 30cm (12in) apart. 
Direct sown seedlings can be thinned to 30cm (12in) or if growing in a pot thin to 2-3 plants per pot.
  Whilst the plant is still young keep the compost moist however once established do not overwater.
Harvest April to October.
Handy Tips Frequent harvests will produce a bushier plant and keep foliage succulent.
Marjoram will therefore go dormant in winter (almost dead looking). Avoid over watering during this period and new growth should appear in spring. 
Companion Planting Plant Marjoram near broccoli, cabbage and cauliflower to repel cabbage butterfly and near cucumbers to repel cucumber beetle.
Nutritional Information Marjoram is a good source of Vitamin K, Iron and manganese. 
Serving Suggestion

Often used in recipes of French or English origin and found in the classic herb combination bouquet garni.

Sweet Marjoram is good with veal, beef, lamb, roast poultry and fish. The leaves are best used fresh, as their flavour is sweeter and milder. 



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